September 27, 2022
South Korean Crypto Exchanges Warn on Litecoin Transactions

Bithumb and Upbit, two major South Korean cryptocurrency exchanges, have issued warnings on Litecoin (LTC) over confidential transactions performed on its latest update.

Both exchanges cited South Korea’s Act on the Reporting and Use of Specific Financial Transaction Information, a policy requiring crypto exchanges to conduct  know-your-customer (KYC  Know Your Customer (KYC) Know Your Customer (KYC) is the process via which the broker is verifying the true identity of its clients in order to comply with multiple regulations. KYC is used to assess the suitability of customers when it comes to anti-money laundering regulations, any type of financial fraud and determining whether they are potentially risky for the brokerage.In particular, KYC guidelines in financial services mandate that individuals make a cohesive effort to verify the identity, suitability, and risks involved with maintaining a business relationship. KYC processes are also utilized by companies for the purpose of ensuring their proposed customers, agents, consultants, or distributors are anti-bribery compliant. In an age of identity theft and myriad hacking, KYC has become a major emphasis by regulators.As such, banks, insurers, export creditors and other financial institutions are increasingly demanding that customers provide detailed due diligence information. These regulations had initially been imposed only on the financial institutions, having now extended to the non-financial industry, fintech, virtual assets dealers, and many non-profit organizations.Regulators Taking No Chances with Identities Regulated brokers in the retail industry are very stringent when applying appropriate KYC verifications after financial watchdogs worldwide have become stricter in monitoring their compliance with the procedure in recent years. Not only brokers use KYC, the procedure is also widely used by banks, and any financial companies that provide insurance or credit and require appropriate due diligence. Most major jurisdictions in the financial space mandate KYC requirements as well as all regulated brokers.The vast majority of these countries have adopted KYC standards as mandatory only during the past two decades. This has helped curb illicit behavior and has become a fixture of the industry. Know Your Customer (KYC) is the process via which the broker is verifying the true identity of its clients in order to comply with multiple regulations. KYC is used to assess the suitability of customers when it comes to anti-money laundering regulations, any type of financial fraud and determining whether they are potentially risky for the brokerage.In particular, KYC guidelines in financial services mandate that individuals make a cohesive effort to verify the identity, suitability, and risks involved with maintaining a business relationship. KYC processes are also utilized by companies for the purpose of ensuring their proposed customers, agents, consultants, or distributors are anti-bribery compliant. In an age of identity theft and myriad hacking, KYC has become a major emphasis by regulators.As such, banks, insurers, export creditors and other financial institutions are increasingly demanding that customers provide detailed due diligence information. These regulations had initially been imposed only on the financial institutions, having now extended to the non-financial industry, fintech, virtual assets dealers, and many non-profit organizations.Regulators Taking No Chances with Identities Regulated brokers in the retail industry are very stringent when applying appropriate KYC verifications after financial watchdogs worldwide have become stricter in monitoring their compliance with the procedure in recent years. Not only brokers use KYC, the procedure is also widely used by banks, and any financial companies that provide insurance or credit and require appropriate due diligence. Most major jurisdictions in the financial space mandate KYC requirements as well as all regulated brokers.The vast majority of these countries have adopted KYC standards as mandatory only during the past two decades. This has helped curb illicit behavior and has become a fixture of the industry. Read this Term) and  anti-money laundering (AML  Anti-Money Laundering (AML) Anti-money laundering (AML) is a term that describes laws, processes, and regulations that are intended to prevent illegally obtained funds from being disguised as income gained through legitimate means. The fundamental purpose of the AML laws is to help safeguard, detect, and report suspicious activity including the predicate offenses to money laundering and terrorist financing, such as securities fraud and market manipulation.Most exchanges have AML measures that include identity verification (Know-Your-Customer checks) and bots that monitor for suspicious trading activity.AML Laws at WorkAML laws take explicit aim at corruption, tax evasion, market manipulation, and the trade of illegal goods. Much of their emphasis also looks to bring to light the efforts individuals or entities utilize to conceal these crimes.Essentially, AML procedures are intended to make it harder for criminals to “hide the loot.” Often, money launderers attempt to disguise their illicitly-obtained funds by funneling it through a legitimate cash business, like a regulated cryptocurrency exchange. Therefore, it is up to the businesses to ensure that they aren’t unwillingly part of a money-laundering scheme.One of the most prevalent issues to combat is laundering, which involves running money through a legitimate cash-based business owned by the criminal organization or its associates. A supposedly legitimate business can then deposit the money, which the criminals can subsequently withdraw.Launderers can also target foreign accounts to make deposits it, depositing cash below several regulatory thresholds that fail to garner suspicion. In the US for example, many transfers or cash payments under $10,000 are unlikely to draw the attention of regulatory authorities.Additionally, money launderers can move cash into dishonest brokers who are willing to ignore existing regulations in return for large commissions. Anti-money laundering (AML) is a term that describes laws, processes, and regulations that are intended to prevent illegally obtained funds from being disguised as income gained through legitimate means. The fundamental purpose of the AML laws is to help safeguard, detect, and report suspicious activity including the predicate offenses to money laundering and terrorist financing, such as securities fraud and market manipulation.Most exchanges have AML measures that include identity verification (Know-Your-Customer checks) and bots that monitor for suspicious trading activity.AML Laws at WorkAML laws take explicit aim at corruption, tax evasion, market manipulation, and the trade of illegal goods. Much of their emphasis also looks to bring to light the efforts individuals or entities utilize to conceal these crimes.Essentially, AML procedures are intended to make it harder for criminals to “hide the loot.” Often, money launderers attempt to disguise their illicitly-obtained funds by funneling it through a legitimate cash business, like a regulated cryptocurrency exchange. Therefore, it is up to the businesses to ensure that they aren’t unwillingly part of a money-laundering scheme.One of the most prevalent issues to combat is laundering, which involves running money through a legitimate cash-based business owned by the criminal organization or its associates. A supposedly legitimate business can then deposit the money, which the criminals can subsequently withdraw.Launderers can also target foreign accounts to make deposits it, depositing cash below several regulatory thresholds that fail to garner suspicion. In the US for example, many transfers or cash payments under $10,000 are unlikely to draw the attention of regulatory authorities.Additionally, money launderers can move cash into dishonest brokers who are willing to ignore existing regulations in return for large commissions. Read this Term) procedures. These warnings tend to be followed by delistings on South Korean exchanges.

In 2011, Litecoin became one of the earliest rivals to Bitcoin (BTC). According to CoinMarketCap, it is the 18th biggest crypto asset in terms of value, with a market capitalization of more than $5 billion.

“After the designation of a significant item, Upbit will generally conduct a detailed review of the relevant digital asset to determine whether to extend, release, or terminate the final transaction support. If the reason for the designation of a significant item is not fully explained during the review period, Upbit will notify the end of the transaction support through a separate notice, and the exact transaction support end schedule will be announced through the transaction support end notice,” Upbit commented in a statement.

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